Kara Jorgo
Taste 7
Aftertaste 6
Bottle Design 6
Price 10

Is this vodka theme revolving around horses or around dances?

This one is called Кара Жорго – Kara Jorgo vodka. In the Kyrgyz language, kara means „black“, and jorgo means a certain „pacer“ horse, so that would make it a „black horse“ – what a fine name for..

Summary 7.3 peachy

Kara Jorgo

This one is called Кара Жорго – Kara Jorgo vodka (thanks to Kubat for clearing this up in the comments). In the Kyrgyz language, kara means „black“, and jorgo means a certain kind of „pacer“ horse, so that would make it a „black horse“ – what a fine name for a spirit! Also, there is a black horse on the label. But I am told that there is more to this word „Kara Jorgo“, since it is also the name of a Kyrgyz national dance. So maybe this vodka is supposed to get you in the mood for dancing?

Will Kara Jorgo vodka make you dance?

I had this vodka in a small village called Tamga located on the southern shores of Issyk-kul. I was staying in a guesthouse there, and because summer had already passed, there were not many other tourists around. Luckily, I was able to find a Japanese traveler to share the bottle with. His name was Hide, and he was a runner and a musician. Hide had a little bluetooth speaker and he put on classical music. He liked Bach.

We toasted our way through the bottle. It had cost 100som for 0.48l (500ml/3€ – 10/10) and was thus among the most affordable spirits I had ever tried. The bottle looked good, I liked the horse and the simplicity of it (6/10). The taste was good too, a bit sweet (7/10), and the aftertaste was okay, slightly better than average, but not great (6/10).

In the end, we thought the vodka was good, but it didn’t make us dance.

A 7.25.

1 Comment

  1. Kubat 8. December 2015
    Antworten

    Hi Christoph,
    Thanks for your reviews! The blog is a real fun. I will base my choice of Kyrgyz vodkas on your reviews. :) May I also suggest some correct details regarding the name of this one? The second word of its name reads as „jorgo“, not „shorgo“. And „jorgo“ does not mean just a horse, it means pacer. The generic word for „horse“ is „at“ or „jylky“.
    Cheers!
    Kubat

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